Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determinations in the Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Carbon and Alloy Steel Threaded Rod from China and India

FACT SHEET

Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determinations in the Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Carbon and Alloy Steel Threaded Rod from China and India

• On July 23, 2019, the Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative preliminary determinations of the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of carbon and alloy steel threaded rod from China and India.

• The CVD law provides U.S. businesses and workers with a transparent, quasi-judicial, and internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the market-distorting effects caused by unfair subsidization of imports into the United States, establishing an opportunity to compete on a level playing field.

• For the purpose of a CVD investigation, a countervailable subsidy is financial assistance from a foreign government that benefits the production of goods by foreign companies and is limited to specific enterprises or industries, or is contingent either upon export performance or upon the use of domestic goods over imported goods.

• In the China investigation, Commerce assigned a preliminary subsidy rate of 23.41 percent to mandatory respondent Ningbo Zhongjiang High Strength Bolts Co., Ltd. and 24.89 percent to mandatory respondent Zhejiang Junyue Standard Part Co., Ltd. The preliminary subsidy rate for all other Chinese producers and exporters is 23.83 percent.

• In the India investigation, Commerce assigned a preliminary subsidy rate of 6.07 percent to mandatory respondent Mangal Steel Enterprises Limited, and 155.03 percent to mandatory respondent Daksh Fasteners. The preliminary subsidy rate for all other Indian producers and exporters is 6.07 percent.

• Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of carbon and alloy steel threaded rod from China, and India based on these preliminary rates.

• The petitioner is Vulcan Threaded Products Inc. (Pelham, AL). Read More →

https://enforcement.trade.gov/download/factsheets/factsheet-multiple-carbon-alloy-steel-threaded-rods-cvd-prelim-072319.pdf

Proposed Modifications to the U.S.-Korea FTA Rules of Origin Would Likely Have a Negligible Effect on U.S. Imports and Exports, Says USITC

However, USITC Notifies USTR That Two Domestic Producers Filed Objections

Proposed modifications to the United States-Korea Free Trade Agreement (KORUS) rules of origin are likely to have a negligible effect on U.S. imports and U.S. exports, but they could impact the U.S. industry that produces some of the affected articles, reports the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) in its publication U.S.-Korea FTA: Advice on Modifications to Certain Textile and Apparel Rules of Origin.

The USITC, an independent, nonpartisan, factfinding federal agency, produced the report at the request of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

As requested, the report provides advice on the probable economic effect of the proposed modifications to the U.S.-Korea FTA rules of origin on U.S. trade under the agreement, on total U.S. trade, and on domestic production of the affected articles. The proposed modifications, detailed in the USTR's request letter, cover the following of headings of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS):

  • Certain cotton yarns (under HTS heading 5206) with viscose rayon staple fibers (under HTS subheadings 5504.10 or 5507.00);

  • Certain woven fabrics (under HTS heading 5408) with cuprammonium rayon yarns (under HTS subheading 5403.39); and

  • Certain apparel (under HTS heading 6110), accessories, and apparel parts (under HTS heading 6117) of cashmere yarns (under HTS heading 5108). Read More →

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2019/er0724ll1132.htm

Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules, From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

AGENCY: Enforcement and Compliance, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce.

SUMMARY:

On December 28, 2018, Commerce published in the Federal Register the preliminary results of the 2016-2017 administrative review of the antidumping duty order on solar cells from the China.[1] For events subsequent to the Preliminary Results, see Commerce's Issues and Decision Memorandum.[2] The final weighted-average dumping margins are listed below in the “Final Results of Review” section of this notice.

DATES: Applicable July 30, 2019.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeff Pedersen and Krisha Hill, AD/CVD Operations, Office IV, Enforcement and Compliance, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20230; telephone: (202) 482-2769 and (202) 482-4037, respectively.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

On January 28, 2019, Commerce exercised its discretion to toll all deadlines affected by the closure of the Federal Government from December 22, 2018 through January 27, 2019.[3] Subsequently, Commerce extended the deadline for the final results of this review until July 24, 2019.[4]

Scope of the Order

The merchandise covered by this order is crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, and modules, laminates, and panels, consisting of crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, whether or not partially or fully assembled into other products, including, but not limited to, modules, laminates, panels and building integrated materials.[5]Merchandise covered by this order is currently classified in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) under subheadings 8501.61.0000, 8507.20.80, 8541.40.6015, 8541.40.6020, 8541.40.6025, 8541.40.6030, 8541.40.6035, 8541.40.6045, and 8501.31.8000. Although these HTSUS subheadings are provided for convenience and customs purposes, the written description of the scope of this order is dispositive. Read More →

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/07/30/2019-16159/crystalline-silicon-photovoltaic-cells-whether-or-not-assembled-into-modules-from-the-peoples

Members consider requests for panels to review US safeguard on solar cells, Indian sugar sector

At a meeting of the Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) on 22 July, WTO members considered a request from China for a dispute panel to review a US safeguard measure on imports of crystalline silicon photovoltaic products. Members also considered three separate requests from Brazil, Australia and Guatemala for panels to review India’s support measures for the sugar sector.

DS562 United States – Safeguard Measure on Imports of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Products

China submitted its first request for a panel to review a US safeguard measure on imports of crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells. China noted that the measure, which took effect in January 2018, is in the form of a tariff rate quota imposed for a period of four years, with unchanging in-quota quantities and annual reductions in the rates of duty applicable to goods entered in excess of those quantities in the second, third and fourth years. The duty rate for the first year was set at 30%.

China said the measure violates the core principles of the WTO disciplining the proper use of safeguard measures. The United States failed to provide a reasoned and adequate explanation of any of the essential conditions justifying the imposition of a safeguard, it said.  This is not the first challenge against US safeguard measures, China noted, with several prior challenges resulting in the US measures being found WTO-inconsistent and Korea initiating similar proceedings against the US solar cells safeguard last year. Consultations were held on 22 October 2018 with a view to reaching a mutually satisfactory solution, China noted, but the talks failed to resolve the dispute, prompting China to submit its request for the panel. Read More →

https://www.wto.org/english/news_e/news19_e/dsb_16jul19_e.htm

Comment Request; Report on the State of Counterfeit and Pirated Goods Trafficking and Recommendations

The Department of Commerce is seeking comments from intellectual property rights holders, online third-party marketplaces and other third-party intermediaries, and other private-sector stakeholders on the state of counterfeit and pirated goods trafficking through online third-party marketplaces and recommendations for curbing the trafficking in such counterfeit and pirated goods. All responses to this notice will be shared with interagency teams, and specifically the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), for use in preparing a report for the President as directed by the April 3, 2019 Presidential Memorandum on “Combating Trafficking in Counterfeit and Pirated Goods” (Presidential Memorandum). Read More →

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/07/10/2019-14715/comment-request-report-on-the-state-of-counterfeit-and-pirated-goods-trafficking-and-recommendations

Steel Propane Cylinders from China and Thailand Injure U.S. Industry, Says USITC

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of steel propane cylinders from China and Thailand that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are sold in the United States at less than fair value and subsidized by the government of China.

Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Irving A. Williamson, Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, and Jason E. Kearns voted in the affirmative.  Commissioner Meredith M. Broadbent did not participate in these investigations.

As a result of the USITC’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of this product from China and antidumping duty orders on such imports from Thailand. 

The Commission’s public report Steel Propane Cylinders from China and Thailand (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-607 and 731-TA-1417 and 1419 (Final), USITC Publication 4938, August 2019) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations. Read More →

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2019/er0717ll1129.htm

USITC Votes to Continue Investigations of Certain Collated Steel Staples from China, Korea, and Taiwan

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that there is a reasonable indication that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of collated steel staples from China that are allegedly subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair value.  The Commission further found that imports of this product from Korea and Taiwan are negligible and voted to terminate those investigations.

Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Irving A. Williamson, Meredith M. Broadbent, and Rhonda K. Schmidtlein voted in the affirmative with respect to China and made findings of negligibility with respect to Korea and Taiwan.  Commissioner Jason E. Kearns did not participate in these investigations.

As a result of the Commission’s affirmative determinations, the U.S. Department of Commerce will continue with its antidumping and countervailing duty investigations concerning imports of this product from China, with its preliminary countervailing duty determination due on or about August 30, 2019, and its preliminary antidumping duty determination due on or about November 16, 2019.  As a result of the Commission’s findings of negligibility, the investigations concerning imports of this product from Korea and Taiwan will be terminated. Read More →

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2019/er0719ll1130.htm

WTO issues panel reports regarding US measures on Canadian, Mexican steel and aluminium

On 11 July the WTO circulated two panel report in the cases brought by Canada and Mexico in “United States — Certain Measures on Steel and Aluminium Products” (DS550) and “United States — Certain Measures on Steel and Aluminium Products” (DS551).

On 23 May and 28 May respectively the parties notified the WTO that they had reached a mutually agreed solution to their disputes, which consisted of the United States' elimination of certain duties on steel and aluminium products from Canada and Mexico. In accordance with Article 12.7 of the Dispute Settlement Understanding, the panel reports provide a brief description of the cases and note that solutions have been reached.


DS550 United States — Certain Measures on Steel and Aluminium Products

In pdf format:

Read More →

https://www.wto.org/english/news_e/news19_e/550_551r_e.htm

Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determinations in the Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Fabricated Structural Steel from China and Mexico...

• On July 8, 2019, the Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative preliminary determinations of the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of fabricated structural steel (FSS) from China and Mexico and a negative preliminary determination in the CVD investigation of imports of FSS from Canada.

• The CVD law provides U.S. businesses and workers with a transparent, quasi-judicial, and internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the market-distorting effects caused by unfair subsidization of imports into the United States, establishing an opportunity to compete on a level playing field.

• For the purpose of a CVD investigation, a countervailable subsidy is financial assistance from a foreign government that benefits the production of goods by foreign companies and is limited to specific enterprises or industries, or is contingent either upon export performance or upon the use of domestic goods over imported goods.

• In the Canada investigation, Commerce assigned a preliminary subsidy rate of 0.12 percent (de minimis) and 0.45 percent (de minimis) to mandatory respondents Les Constructions Beauce-Atlas Inc. and Les Industries Canatal Inc., respectively.

• In the China investigation, Commerce assigned a preliminary subsidy rates of 30.30 percent and 36.07 percent to mandatory respondents Modern Heavy Industries (Taicang) Co., Ltd. and Shanghai Matsuo Steel Structure Co., Ltd., respectively. Commerce also assigned a subsidy rate of 177.43 percent to the following non-responsive companies: Hongju Metals Co., Ltd., Huaye Steel Structure Co., Jiangsu Kingmore Storage Equipment, Jiangsu Zhengchang Cereal Oil & Feed, Ningbo Jiangbei Huarentai Trade, Ningbo Win Success Machinery Co., Ltd., Shangdong Taipeng Home Products Co., Sinopec Engineering (Group) Co., Ltd., Sunjoy Industrial Group Limited, Sunjoy Industries (Jiashan) Co., Ltd., Wuxi Huishan Metalwork Technology Co., Ltd., and Yueqing Yihua New Energy Technology. The preliminary subsidy rate for all other Chinese producers and exporters is 32.64 percent. Read More →

https://enforcement.trade.gov/download/factsheets/factsheet-multiple-fabricated-structural-steel-cvd-prelim-070819.pdf

Notice of Product Exclusions: China's Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation

Effective July 6, 2018, the U.S. Trade Representative (Trade Representative) imposed additional duties on goods of China with an annual trade value of approximately $34 billion (the $34 billion action) as part of the action in the Section 301 investigation of China's acts, policies, and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation.

The Trade Representative's determination included a decision to establish a product exclusion process. The Trade Representative initiated the exclusion process in July 2018, and stakeholders have submitted requests for the exclusion of specific products. In December 2018, March 2019, April 2019, May 2019, and June 2019, the Trade Representative granted exclusion requests. This notice announces the Trade Representative's determination to grant additional exclusion requests, as specified in the Annex to this notice. The Trade Representative will continue to issue decisions on pending requests on a periodic basis.

DATES:

The product exclusions announced in this notice will apply as of the July 6, 2018 effective date of the $34 billion action, and will extend for one year after the publication of this notice. U.S. Customs and Border Protection will issue instructions on entry guidance and implementation. Read More →

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/07/09/2019-14562/notice-of-product-exclusions-chinas-acts-policies-and-practices-related-to-technology-transfer

USITC Institutes Section 337 Investigation of Certain Touch-Controlled Mobile Devices, Computers, and Components Thereof

The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) has voted to institute an investigation of certain touch-controlled mobile devices, computers, and components thereof.  The products at issue in the investigation are described in the Commission’s notice of investigation.

The investigation is based on a complaint filed by Neodron Ltd. of Dublin, Ireland, on May 22, 2019.  An amended complaint was filed on May 23, 2019.  The complaint, as amended, alleges violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 in the importation into the United States and sale of certain touch-controlled mobile devices, computers, and components thereof that infringe patents asserted by the complainant.  The complainant requests that the USITC issue a limited exclusion order and cease and desist orders.

The USITC has identified the following as respondents in this investigation:

Amazon,com, Inc., of Seattle, WA;
Dell Technologies Inc. of Round Rock, TX;
HP Inc. of Palo Alto, CA;
Lenovo Group Ltd. of Beijing, China;
Lenovo (United States) Inc. of Morrisville, NC;
Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, WA;
Motorola Mobility LLC of Chicago, IL;
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., of Suwon, South Korea; and
Samsung Electronics America, Inc., of Ridgefield Park, NJ.

By instituting this investigation (337-TA-1162), the USITC has not yet made any decision on the merits of the case.  The USITC’s Chief Administrative Law Judge will assign the case to one of the USITC’s administrative law judges (ALJ), who will schedule and hold an evidentiary hearing.  The ALJ will make an initial determination as to whether there is a violation of section 337; that initial determination is subject to review by the Commission. Read More →

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2019/er0619ll1116.htm

Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS)

To address ongoing aviation security threats, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is amending its regulations pertaining to the submission of advance air cargo data to implement a mandatory Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) program for any inbound aircraft required to make entry under the CBP regulations that will have commercial cargo aboard. The ACAS program requires the inbound carrier or other eligible party to electronically transmit specified advance cargo data (ACAS data) to CBP for air cargo transported onboard U.S.-bound aircraft as early as practicable, but no later than prior to loading of the cargo onto the aircraft. The ACAS program enhances the security of the aircraft and passengers on U.S.-bound flights by enabling CBP to perform targeted risk assessments on the air cargo prior to the aircraft's departure for the United States. These risk assessments will identify and prevent high-risk air cargo from being loaded on the aircraft that could pose a risk to the aircraft during flight. Read More →

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/06/12/2018-12315/air-cargo-advance-screening-acas

United States – Mexico - Canada Trade Deal

Modernizing NAFTA into a 21st Century Trade Agreement

The United States, Mexico, and Canada have reached an agreement to modernize the 24-year-old NAFTA into a 21st century, high-standard agreement. The new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) will support mutually beneficial trade leading to freer markets, fairer trade, and robust economic growth in North America.

Chapters with Key Achievements include:

  • Intellectual Property

  • Digital Trade

  • De minimis

  • Financial Services

  • Environment

Read More →

Strengthening North American Trade in Agriculture

While agriculture has generally performed well under NAFTA, important improvements in the agreement will enable food and agriculture to trade more fairly, and to expand exports of American agricultural products.

Key Achievements include:

  • Expanded Market Access for American Dairy, Poultry & Egg Products

  • Canada’s Milk Classes 6 & 7 to be Eliminated

  • Mechanism for Cooperation on Ag Biotechnology, Including New Technologies such as Gene Editing

  • Significant Commitments to Avoid Trade-Distorting Policies

  • Fair Treatment in Quality Grading for American Wheat

  • Non-Discrimination and Transparency Commitments Regarding the Sale and Distribution of Alcohol Beverages

Read More →

https://ustr.gov/usmca

U.S.-Mexico Joint Declaration

The United States and Mexico met this week to address the shared challenges of irregular migration, to include the entry of migrants into the United States in violation of U.S. law. Given the dramatic increase in migrants moving from Central America through Mexico to the United States, both countries recognize the vital importance of rapidly resolving the humanitarian emergency and security situation. The Governments of the United States and Mexico will work together to immediately implement a durable solution.

As a result of these discussions, the United States and Mexico commit to:

Mexican Enforcement Surge

Mexico will take unprecedented steps to increase enforcement to curb irregular migration, to include the deployment of its National Guard throughout Mexico, giving priority to its southern border. Mexico is also taking decisive action to dismantle human smuggling and trafficking organizations as well as their illicit financial and transportation networks. Additionally, the United States and Mexico commit to strengthen bilateral cooperation, including information sharing and coordinated actions to better protect and secure our common border.

Migrant Protection Protocols

The United States will immediately expand the implementation of the existing Migrant Protection Protocols across its entire Southern Border. This means that those crossing the U.S. Southern Border to seek asylum will be rapidly returned to Mexico where they may await the adjudication of their asylum claims. Read More →

https://www.state.gov/u-s-mexico-joint-declaration/


Implementation of New Commerce Section 232 Exclusions Portal

This interim final rule changes the process for requesting exclusions from the duties and quantitative limitations on imports of aluminum and steel discussed in two Commerce interim final rules implementing the exclusion process authorized by the President as part of the action he took to adjust imports under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended (“232”). The Department of Commerce (“the Department”) has developed the portal referred to henceforth as the “232 Exclusions Portal” for persons submitting exclusion requests, objections to exclusion requests, rebuttals, and surrebuttals to replace the use of the Federal rulemaking portal (http://www.regulations.gov) and streamline the exclusions process while enhancing data integrity and quality controls. Based on public comment on the current process for submissions to the Department, Commerce is publishing this interim final rule to grant the public the ability to submit new exclusion requests as soon as possible through the 232 Exclusions Portal while still allowing the opportunity for public comment on the portal. Read More →

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/06/10/2019-12254/implementation-of-new-commerce-section-232-exclusions-portal

USITC Begins Investigation Concerning Possible Modifications To The U.S. Generalized System of Preferences For Removals, Competitive Need Limitation Waivers, and Redesignations

The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) is seeking input for a newly initiated investigation concerning possible modifications to the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP).

The investigation, Generalized System of Preferences: Possible Modifications, 2018 Review, was requested by the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) in a letter received on June 4, 2019.

As requested, the USITC, an independent, nonpartisan, factfinding federal agency, will provide advice as to the probable economic effect on total U.S. imports, on U.S. industries producing like or directly competitive articles, and on U.S. consumers of the removal from eligibility of two HTS subheadings for certain GSP countries.

The removals in consideration are:

  • 3907.61.00 (Polyethylene terephthalate, having a viscosity number of 78 ml/g or higher) from Pakistan,

  • 3907.69.00 (Polyethylene terephthalate, having a viscosity number less than 78 ml/g) from Pakistan.

The USTR also requested that the USITC provide advice on whether any industry in the United States is likely to be adversely affected by competitive need limitation waivers for two HTS subheadings for certain GSP countries and advice as to the probable economic effect on total U.S. imports, as well as on consumers, of the requested waivers. The USITC will also provide advice as to whether a like or directly competitive article was produced in the United States in any of the preceding three calendar years for these articles. "Competitive need limitations" represent the maximum import level of a product that is eligible for duty-free treatment under the GSP.  Once the limit is reached, trade is considered "competitive," benefits are no longer needed, and imports of the article become ineligible for GSP treatment, unless a waiver is granted.  With respect to the competitive need limit in section 503(c)(2)(A)(i)(I) of the 1974 Act, the USITC, as requested, will use the dollar value limit of $185 million. The HTS subheadings in consideration are:

  • 3823.11.00 (Stearic acid) from Indonesia,

  • 9001.50.00 (Spectacle lenses of materials other than glass, unmounted) from Thailand. Read More →

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2019/er0607ll1110.htm

Statement from the President Regarding Emergency Measures to Address the Border Crisis

As everyone knows, the United States of America has been invaded by hundreds of thousands of people coming through Mexico and entering our country illegally.  This sustained influx of illegal aliens has profound consequences on every aspect of our national life—overwhelming our schools, overcrowding our hospitals, draining our welfare system, and causing untold amounts of crime.  Gang members, smugglers, human traffickers, and illegal drugs and narcotics of all kinds are pouring across the Southern Border and directly into our communities.  Thousands of innocent lives are taken every year as a result of this lawless chaos.  It must end NOW!

Mexico’s passive cooperation in allowing this mass incursion constitutes an emergency and extraordinary threat to the national security and economy of the United States.  Mexico has very strong immigration laws and could easily halt the illegal flow of migrants, including by returning them to their home countries.  Additionally, Mexico could quickly and easily stop illegal aliens from coming through its southern border with Guatemala. Read More →

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/statement-president-regarding-emergency-measures-address-border-crisis/

Proclamation to Modify the List of Beneficiary Developing Countries Under the Trade Act of 1974

1.  In Executive Order 11888 of November 24, 1975, the President designated India as a beneficiary developing country for purposes of the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) (19 U.S.C. 2461 et seq.).

2.  Pursuant to section 502(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the “1974 Act”) (19 U.S.C. 2462(d)(1)), the President may withdraw, suspend, or limit the application of the duty-free treatment accorded under the GSP with respect to any beneficiary developing country.  In taking any action under section 502(d)(1) of the 1974 Act, the President shall consider the factors set forth in sections 501 and 502(c) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2461 and 2462(c)).

3.  Section 502(c)(4) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2462(c)(4)) provides that, in determining whether to designate any country as a beneficiary developing country, the President shall take into account, among other factors, the extent to which such country has assured the United States that it will provide equitable and reasonable access to the markets and basic commodity resources of such country and the extent to which such country has assured the United States that it will refrain from engaging in unreasonable export practices. Read More →

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/proclamation-modify-list-beneficiary-developing-countries-trade-act-1974-2/

Turkey Designation as a Developing Country in WTO GSP Under Section 201 is Removed

Consistent with the Presidential Proclamation 9887 to Modify the List of Beneficiary Developing Countries Under the Trade Act of 1974, issued on May 16, 2019, the designation of Turkey as a beneficiary developing country under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) is removed from the list of developing country WTO Members exempt from application of the safeguard measures on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cell (CSPV) products and large residential washers. Read More →

https://csms.cbp.gov/viewmssg.asp?Recid=24254&page=&srch_argv=&srchtype=&btype=&sortby=&sby=

Certain Lithium Ion Battery Cells, Battery Modules, Battery Packs, Components Thereof, and Processes Therefor

The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) has voted to institute an investigation of certain lithium ion batteries, battery cells, battery modules, battery packs, components thereof, and processes therefor.  The products at issue in the investigation are described in the Commission’s notice of investigation.

The investigation is based on a complaint filed by LG Chem, Ltd. of Seoul, South Korea, and LG Chem Michigan, Inc. of Holland, MI, on April 29, 2019. The complaint, as supplemented, alleges violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 in the importation into the United States, the sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain lithium ion batteries, battery cells, battery modules, battery packs, components thereof, and processes therefor that misappropriate trade secrets asserted by the complainant.  The complainant requests that the USITC issue a limited exclusion order and cease and desist orders. Read More →

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2019/er0529ll1106.htm